Schizophrenia awareness week 2015

From Youtube:

1 in 100 people experience schizophrenia. Many face discrimination, and don't have access to the right support. We're fighting to change that.

In our video for Schizophrenia Awareness Week 2015, we asked four people with experience of the illness to tell us their stories. We asked them how the world sees you when you have schizophrenia.

Their responses are heartfelt, shocking and inspiring. Above all they send a clear message: with the right support, a better life is possible.

But mental health services are severely underfunded. Too many people have to wait too long to get the care they need. Rethink Mental Illness is fighting to change this, and with your help, we can.

How your smartphone can detect bipolar disorder

From MIT Tech teview:

How your smartphone can detect bipolar disorder

The sensors in smartphones can accurately detect the changes in mood that are indicative of bipolar disorder, according to a new study. That could lead to faster treatment and better outcomes for sufferers.

Bipolar disorder is a condition characterized by mood swings that vary from extreme elation to severe depression. At one end of this spectrum, patients experience extreme highs and hyperactivity, while at the other they feel devastatingly low and lethargic. These moods can change quickly, last for weeks or months, and be separated by long periods of time, sometimes years.

Spotting these mood changes in time to initiate treatment is a difficult business. There are no reliable biomarkers for this condition, so patients are usually given psychological tests designed to measure state of mind. Inevitably, accurate diagnosis often lags the actual changes in mood by some time.

Paul Aisen: University sues Alzheimer’s researcher who left for a position with rival institution

From WSJ:

Paul Aisen: University sues Alzheimer’s researcher who left for a position with rival institution

Last May, noted Alzheimer’s researcher Paul Aisen announced he was leaving his position at the University of California, San Diego, after eight years. Some 30 colleagues followed him to regional rival University of Southern California.
In July, the University of California’s board sued Dr. Aisen-and 11 of his colleagues and USC.

Emily Dreyfuss' life as a Robot at Wired

From wired.com:

Emily Dreyfuss' life as a Robot at Wired

I have been part robot since May. Instead of legs, I move on gyroscopically stabilized wheels. Instead of a face, I have an iPad screen. Instead of eyes, a camera with no peripheral vision. Instead of a mouth, a speaker whose volume I can’t even gauge with my own ears. And instead of ears, a tinny microphone that crackles and hisses with every high note.

I’m a remote worker; while most of WIRED is in San Francisco, I live in Boston. We IM. We talk on the phone. We tweet at each other, but I am often left out of crucial face-to-face meetings, spontaneous brainstorm sessions, gossip in the kitchen.

So my boss found a solution: a telepresence robot from Double Robotics, which would be my physical embodiment at headquarters, extending myself through technology. Specifically, an iPad on a stick on a Segway-like base.

How a Kalman filter works, in pictures - tutorial

From bzarg.com:

Human-Robot symbiosis at Amazon’s warehouse

Surprisingly few software engineers and scientists seem to know about it, and that makes me sad because it is such a general and powerful tool for combining information in the presence of uncertainty. At times its ability to extract accurate information seems almost magical— and if it sounds like I’m talking this up too much, then take a look at this previously posted video where I demonstrate a Kalman filter figuring out the orientation of a free-floating body by looking at its velocity. Totally neat!

Hearing Colors with Neil Harbisson

From thisiscolossal.com:

Part of The Connected Series by Samsung.

The life of Neil Harbisson is like something out of a sci-fi novel. Neil was born with achromatopsia, a rare condition that leaves 1 in 30,000 people completely colorblind. But Neil isn’t colorblind, far from it.

After convincing his doctors to implant an antenna into the back of his head, Neil now possesses a new sense – the ability to hear colors. In this short film by Greg Brunkalla, HEARING COLORS, Neil takes you through a day in his life and into an entirely new world.

A Computational Approach for Obstruction-Free Photography

From Youtube:

The video accompanying our SIGGRAPH 2015 paper " A Computational Approach for Obstruction-Free Photography". We present a unified computational approach for taking photos through reflecting or occluding elements such as windows and fences. Rather than capturing a single image, we instruct the user to take a short image sequence while slightly moving the camera. Differences that often exist in the relative position of the background and the obstructing elements from the camera allow us to separate them based on their motions, and to recover the desired background scene as if the visual obstructions were not there. We show results on controlled experiments and many real and practical scenarios, including shooting through reflections, fences, and raindrop-covered windows.

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