Frozen out: the US interpreters abandoned on Europe’s border

From The Guardian Jamshid and Mati served the US military as interpreters during the war in Afghanistan, but like many, haven’t been granted visas to emigrate to the US. With their lives threatened by the Taliban, they joined the migrants heading for western Europe, only to find themselves trapped in Serbia on the wrong side of impenetrable borders. They live in a squalid warehouse in Belgrade. With smugglers refusing to take them across dangerous border crossings, all they can do is wait.

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Cohousing communities help prevent social isolation

From PBS Groups in Denmark and the U.S. are choosing to live in intentionally intergenerational communities, which emerged to strengthen social ties between aging seniors and their younger counterparts who are balancing work and family. People living in them say the model fosters an interdependent environment and helps everyone feel more comfortable with the process of getting older. NewsHour Weekend's Saskia de Melker reports.

HANDLE robot - wheeled robot from Boston Dynamics

From theverge.com, Boston Dynamics : Boston Dynamics is best known for its bipedal and quadrupedal robots, but it turns out the company has also been experimenting with some radical new tech: the wheel. The company’s new wheeled, upright robot is named Handle (“because it’s supposed to handle objects”) and looks like a cross between a Segway and the two-legged Atlas bot. Handle robot hasn’t been officially unveiled, but was shown off by company founder Marc Raibert in a presentation to investors. Footage of the presentation was uploaded to YouTube by venture capitalist Steve Jurvetson. Raibert describes Handle as an “experiment in combining wheels with legs, with a very dynamic system that is balancing itself all the time and has a lot of knowledge of how to throw its weight around.” He adds that using wheels is more efficient than legs, although there’s obviously a trade-off in terms of maneuvering over uneven ground. “

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