machine learning

There's Waldo is a robot that finds Waldo

From Youtube: We built a little robot called "There's Waldo" to test the capabilities of Google's new AutoML Vision service. We've found that technologies can be unapproachable, and irrelevant by extension, to many people—so we learn ahead of the curve, and show our work in fun ways, to demonstrate what's possible. There's Waldo is a robot built to find Waldo and point at him. The robot arm is controlled by a Raspberry Pi using the PYUARM Python library for the UARM Metal. Once initialized the arm is instructed to extend and take a photo of the canvas below. It then uses OpenCV to find and extract faces from the photo. The faces are sent to the Google Auto ML Vision service which compares each one against the trained Waldo model. If a confident match of 95% (0.95) or higher is found the robot arm is instructed to extend to the coordinates of the matching face and point at it. If there are multiple Waldos in a photo it will point to each one. While only a prototype, the fastest There's Waldo has pointed out a match has been 4.45 seconds which is better than most 5 year olds.

Meet the Godfather of AI, Geoff Hinton

From Youtube: For nearly 40 years, Geoff Hinton has been trying to get computers to learn like people do, a quest almost everyone thought was crazy or at least hopeless - right up until the moment it revolutionized the field. In this Hello World video, Bloomberg Businessweek's Ashlee Vance meets the Godfather of AI.

You and AI – the history, capabilities and frontiers of AI - Demis Hassabis

From Youtube: Demis Hassabis, world-renowned British neuroscientist, artificial intelligence (AI) researcher and the co-founder and CEO of DeepMind, explores the groundbreaking research driving the application of AI to scientific discovery. The talk launches the Royal Society’s 2018 series: You and AI, a collaborative effort to help people understand what machine learning and AI are, how these technologies work and the ways they may affect our lives.

Waymo 360° experience: a fully self-driving journey

From youtube.com: Waymo began as the Google self-driving car project in 2009. Today, we have the world’s only fleet of fully self-driving cars on public roads. Step into our 360° video and take control of the camera to see through the “eyes” of our car. Then, be one of the first in the world to take a ride with Waymo. This film was built using footage and real-time data from an actual trip on city streets.

Optimal Transport Theory - New Frontiers in Mathematics - Cédric Villani

From youtube.com: New Frontiers in Mathematics: Imperial College London and CNRS international symposium Professor Villani from Université Claude Bernard (Lyon), discusses optimal transport theory, artificial intelligence and the journey and opportunities that a career in mathematics can offer.

Fairness in Machine Learning: Lessons from Political Philosophy

From arxiv.org: Abstract: What does it mean for a machine learning model to be `fair', in terms which can be operationalised? Should fairness consist of ensuring everyone has an equal probability of obtaining some benefit, or should we aim instead to minimise the harms to the least advantaged? Can the relevant ideal be determined by reference to some alternative state of affairs in which a particular social pattern of discrimination does not exist? Various definitions proposed in recent literature make different assumptions about what terms like discrimination and fairness mean and how they can be defined in mathematical terms. Questions of discrimination, egalitarianism and justice are of significant interest to moral and political philosophers, who have expended significant efforts in formalising and defending these central concepts. It is therefore unsurprising that attempts to formalise `fairness' in machine learning contain echoes of these old philosophical debates. This paper draws on existing work in moral and political philosophy in order to elucidate emerging debates about fair machine learning.

PDF link.

The future of humanity and technology - Stephen Fry

From youtube.com: Stephen Fry, actor, comedian, journalist, author, tech enthusiast and polymath delivered his Shannon lecture "The future of humanity and technology". With over 150 film, TV, and audio performances and over 20 written works, as well as over 12 million Twitter followers, Fry’s wit and wisdom have been read, seen or heard around the globe over multiple generations.

Fry explores the impact on humanity of emergent technologies and, in classic Bell Labs style, looks back at human history to understand the present and the future. He will outline how humans have adapted to revolutionary changes in all aspects of life over the past millennia, and uses this as a basis for conjecture about the future of human existence in the machine or industrial internet age, and how best to navigate these murky technological and societal waters.

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